• friend: the sky is full of bats tonight
  • me: i know, isn't it romantic?

webs-we-weave:

amandy-chan:

You don’t know true frustration until you’ve dug several times through a pile of black clothing, in order to find a SPECIFIC article of black clothing.

The struggle is too damn real

(Source: batsandbabydolls, via tolkien-cthulhu-deathmetal)

slobbering:

Santiago Caruso  ~ ”Pan’s Labyrinth I”, 2013

(via pixography)

(via isolatenmedicate)

Timestamp: 1406949860

slobbering:

Santiago Caruso  ~ ”Pan’s Labyrinth I”, 2013

(via pixography)

(via isolatenmedicate)

rrevolutionaries:

[puts head in hands] oh god he’s so attractive

(Source: asriels, via piercedbanana)

the-vampyre:

Follow for horror, bands, and more.

(via malum-et-corvi)

Timestamp: 1406919856

the-vampyre:

Follow for horror, bands, and more.

(via malum-et-corvi)

mightyflower:

to quote hamlet act III scene iii line 92, “no”

(via jdoghalfazn)

evilsoutherngentleman:

kellylugosisdead:

An edition of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein laid out using characters and glyphs from PDF documents obtained through internet searches. The incomplete fonts found in the PDFs were reassembled into the text of Frankenstein based on their frequency of use. The most common characters are employed at the beginning of the book, and the text devolves into less common, more grotesque shapes and forms toward the end. (via The Frankenfont project reconstructs Mary Shelley’s classic Frankenstein using parts of incomplete fonts found in PDFs from the internet. | Fathom)

I’m pretty sure I need this, and that evilsoutherngentleman would likely be interested in it as well.

YES

(Source: jenarcherwood, via leighsterquaintrelle)

Timestamp: 1406898522

evilsoutherngentleman:

kellylugosisdead:

An edition of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein laid out using characters and glyphs from PDF documents obtained through internet searches. The incomplete fonts found in the PDFs were reassembled into the text of Frankenstein based on their frequency of use. The most common characters are employed at the beginning of the book, and the text devolves into less common, more grotesque shapes and forms toward the end. (via The Frankenfont project reconstructs Mary Shelley’s classic Frankenstein using parts of incomplete fonts found in PDFs from the internet. | Fathom)

I’m pretty sure I need this, and that evilsoutherngentleman would likely be interested in it as well.

YES

(Source: jenarcherwood, via leighsterquaintrelle)